Dehydrating apple chips for long term storage

Apples ready for peeling
Apples ready for peeling

Every fall we pick apples. Some years we can them for pies. This year we also dehydrated about half a bushel.

The process is simple enough. Collect enough apples (one batch in our dehydrator takes about 8 apples), core, peel and slice them.  Then you need to dehydrate them. We use a small round style dehydrator but you can do them in the oven or even out doors in a solar dehydrator. 

Open Country 4 Tray Trialmaster 500 Watt Dehydrator Kit
Open Country 4 Tray Trialmaster 500 Watt Dehydrator Kit

Our dehydrator is a Open Country 4 Tray Trialmaster 500 Watt Dehydrator Kit but there are many inexpensive round style dehydrators made by nesco. This one being the most popular, Nesco 600-Watt Food Dehydrator. If you think you might make jerky with yours you should look at this one as it has everything you need to get started, Nesco American Harvest FD-61WHC Snackmaster Express Food Dehydrator All-In-One Kit with Jerky Gun.

I am thinking of upgrading next year to the Excalibur 3900B 9 Tray Deluxe Dehydrator, Black which from what I have read would work in a fraction of the time.

Dehydrated apples
Dehydrated apples

We set the temp at 135 degrees and let them go overnight. I then put some in a small sealed container for immediate use and vacuum seal the rest in our foodsaver (a stainless version of this one FoodSaver V2460 Advanced Design Vacuum Food Sealer).

Dehydrated apples ready to eat
Dehydrated apples ready to eat

As this is the first year we are putting dehydrated apples back I will test these over the course of the winter and into the spring. 

One thing I have learned is that while I can peel two bushels of apples it gets tiring. After one session canning 18 quart jars I had a knot in my back from chopping. 

I am planning on getting a Back To Basics Apple And Potato Peeler, which I have read good things about. Seems like it would save a lot of time.

http://youtu.be/KTsNJXz0_Yw

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